7/2/17

Incredible Things (EA Fragrances)



I'll admit to some bias with Incredible Things; my girlfriend wears it and it smells terrific on her. I don't believe in "skin chemistry" (although I do believe in hygiene), so I'm not saying that there's anything about anyone's skin that makes a fragrance smell differently. This scent seems to be tailored for her though; it fits her personality, her liveliness, her beauty, and I'm impressed with this inexpensive celebuscent. I can't deny that it smells great, and the body lotion works well with it.

Taylor Swift apparently likes eating ambrosia for dessert, because that's what Incredible Things smells like. It's an appetizing gourmand featuring soft analogs of pineapple, coconut, mandarin orange, and vanilla. The sweetness gently drifts into marshmallow, without being obvious and overbearing. There are no piercing accords, no loud ethyl maltol notes, and nothing that screams DRUGSTORE into my nostrils. It's a very happy scent, and yes, it's sweet, but it's also a touch green (a little minty), and it comes together as something classy and mature. It doesn't smell like teeny-bopper crap. It's not "sneaker juice." It's sexy, it's demure, and it works.

When it comes to fragrance, the label and box mean nothing. Taylor Swift's association begins and ends with the ink they used to print her name. Nothing about Incredible Things evokes Ms. Swift, nor should it. What you find is that celebrity scents are just like the rest: they smell good or they don't, and the marketing is irrelevant - it's the quality that matters. I don't know who is really behind this fragrance, but I applaud them for having the sense of off-kilter romance to take an old-fashioned dessert and make it into a perfume.




6 comments:

  1. I've found that "celebuscents" can be a great value, as long as you wait for them to hit the discounters (and don't expect niche miracles!).

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    1. I have no idea what you mean by "niche miracles" but otherwise totally agree with you!

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  2. I'm interested in your comment about no believing in skim chemistry. I wouldn't either if we are talking about the kind of close to magical thinking present in some forums.

    On the other hand, I can believe that the presence of different oils, and peoples propensity to sweat (or not) does affect the smell of some fragrances.

    For instance; if I wear Encre Noir I never get the darker peppery/wood notes - I get the light high notes for the entire period I wear it, and it ends up smelling like Vettiveru. From the reactions of other people I'd guess they smell something similar - my gf thought I was wearing a feminine perfume.

    The more spicy/gourmand elements generally emphasize themselves in anything I wear - again judging from comments received, and musk in any quantity makes me smell like I haven't bathed in weeks.

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    1. Perfumes are designed to work on all skin types. The kind of soap, skin lotion, how often you bathe, and variables in the kind of laundry detergent used all account for the concept of skin chemistry.

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    2. Hmmmm......but what about variances in skin/body temperatures? Men tend to have skin temps warmer than women. Individuals can vary in skin temp by as much as + or - 1.8C.
      Then there's your own natural stench & how that 'blends' with the fragrance. Your personal stench varies from others by your hormone levels & skew, skin microbes, diet, etc.

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    3. All of this is true. However, a good deodorant soap can and will (unless you suffer a rare illness) eradicate one's natural stench. Hormones operate sub-olfactorily and skin microbes, to the best of my knowledge, are bacteria. Are we talking healthy bacteria? Because healthy, i.e., "good" bacteria, are necessary for smelling good.

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